TVR Griffith in motion – a new sports car to take on Aston Martin and Jaguar

TVR has posted a video of its new Griffith undergoing testing at Dunsfold airfield. Although the video doesn’t give us a whole lot of new information, it is our first look at the new car in motion before it goes on sale in 2019.

The new Griffith is the first all new model from TVR since the Sagaris released in 2004 – and the first since the company was bought by entrepreneur Les Edgar in 2013. Featuring a front-mounted V8 engine and rear-wheel drive, the Griffith has models such as the Aston Martin Vantage and Jaguar F-Type in its sights.

On the surface the Griffith looks like a traditional TVR, but scratch beneath and you’ll find a blend of cutting edge tech and old school engineering. The former approach is provided by the use of McLaren F1 designer Gordon Murray’s iStream design and manufacturing process, which allowed the car to move from the sketch board (or CAD screen) to production ready reality in under three years.

TVR Interior

The hi-tech approach doesn’t extend to the engine, however, which is an off-the-shelf 5.0-litre Ford V8. The tried and tested unit isn’t the most advanced engine, but it’s unbustable and should go a long way to shake off TVR’s rather shaky reputation for reliability. Better still, tweaks by famed engineering specialists Cosworth are claimed to deliver even greater performance.

TVR engine layout with Ford V8 firmly behind the front axle

From a design perspective TVR owners of old will undoubtedly be happy with the outcome of the new model’s look – and name, it’s called Griffith – and it’s fair to say it’s a welcome antidote to the rather bland designs that litter our roads in 2017. The side-exit exhaust popping out from behind the front wheel is a design detail that wouldn’t look out of place on the original (1960s) Griffith and the smallest of rear-wings keeps the silhouette as clean as possible.

TVR rear diffuser

Yet these additions are more than just for show, because under its clean lines the TVR boasts some fairly sophisticated aerodynamics. For instance, the side exit exhausts have allowed TVR to create an almost totally flat underside, which means the Griffith is effectively a ‘ground effects’ car. The only notable external addition is the rear spoiler, which has been added to boost traction at high speeds, which will be crucial when the motorsport version of the Griffith takes to the track